Straightpipe Forums

Straightpipe Forums (http://straightpipe.ca/forums/index.php)
-   Your Build (http://straightpipe.ca/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=29)
-   -   944 Turbo (http://straightpipe.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=1539)

chrenan 09-17-2012 03:44 PM

944 Turbo
 
Thought I'd start a log of the work this winter. I've had the car since 2007, its a 1987 944 Turbo originally sold in Japan. The mod list can be found through my signature.

As usual there are lots of things to do over the snowy season. Drive, wrench, repeat as they say.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-J...255B1%255D.jpg

This winter I'll be replacing the factory oil cooler with a larger version, and install an oil temp gauge since the cooler comes with a sensor.

Its also been 5 years since the timing and balance shaft belts have been replaced. Since that is due I'm going to pull the head as well and do the head gasket and a head refresh since those will all be original. Hopefully I won't find anything too scary when I crack the engine open.

The big upgrade will be suspension. I'm currently running double the effective spring rate of the factory setup. Over the winter I'll go to coil overs all round which will let me run proper track spring rates. This means deleting the torsion bars in the rear. I've got a custom setup for the rear coming from Texas:

http://i508.photobucket.com/albums/s...E/IMAG0162.jpg

This setup raises the rear pivot point, therefore correcting for roll center, as it has also been moved a very small amount rearward. It has Rod Ends on the swing arms (solid spherical) to keep alignment specs from being as dynamic as a compliant stock set up. It also solves the difficulty in aligning the rear suspension by not having to get the camber and Toe exactly right at the same time when you tighten the bolts down. You can now get the toe close when adjusting for Camber. Tighten down the bolts, then you can adjust toe with the Turnbuckle that is designed in for easy adjustment after the fact.

Well, that's all for now. This weekend I rolled the car into its hibernation spot in the back of the garage and raised it up. The water is drained and its ready for wrenches.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-v...0/IMG_0076.JPG

JustinL 09-17-2012 08:28 PM

I'm pretty quick with the belts now, so just give me a shout and I'll lend a hand.

chrenan 09-17-2012 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustinL (Post 20602)
I'm pretty quick with the belts now...

Pretty quick? You're as close as Edmonton has to a factory trained 944 tech now. I'll need you for sure, thanks Justin.

aftermath 09-17-2012 11:32 PM

I need him too :), and we live so close he feels guilty if he says no !

RSX-TACY 09-18-2012 03:04 AM

I like... me jelly!

chrenan 09-19-2012 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RSX-TACY (Post 20613)
I like... me jelly!

Thanks! Now if only I could drive as well as you.

So I drained the oil last night. While I was waiting ages for the 20W-50 to come out I did a bit of work on the top, went from this:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-H...0/IMG_0077.JPG

To this:

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-D...0/IMG_0078.JPG

Doesn't look like much progress, but its lots of little things (strut brace, plug wires, cap, fuel rail cover, fuel rail harness, throttle cable, rear intake mount bolts, dipstick mount, all electrical and vacuum connections to the intake) that will let me pull the fuel rail and intake next. After draining the fuel rail its 4 bolts and 2 hose connections on the rail and 8 bolts left on the intake and it all comes out.

chrenan 09-19-2012 06:29 PM

Tools for the work last night:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-I...0/IMG_0079.JPG

Why am I showing these? Well, I get the sense that some folks on the "other" board think the only way to work on cars is to give a bucket full of cash to a Snap-On truck for a master set of tools and a giant roll cab, or to cut a cheque to EZ Motorsports. You can take a more grassroots approach, employing wisely chosen used tools and a budget minded selection of new tools.

In this shot we have:

12 point Craftsman combination wrenches - These are from Sears Canada, they are Chinese made. Finish is poor, fitment is good. I'm really not a fan of the Sears Canada Craftsman tools as they are all Chinese made now, but at US made Craftsman prices. Makes no sense. I bought a full set for pennies on the dollar at a local pawn shop, and that's the only way I'd buy them. I have to be honest though, I've never broken one

6 point Craftsman combination wrenches - These are from Sears USA, they are US made. Finish is excellent, fitment is excellent. I'm a huge fan of US made craftsman tools, the quality and value is excellent at a fraction of tool truck prices. Now, I know what you're saying, "6 point combination wrenches, why?". I know, I know. Every 12 point combination wrench on earth has been flank drive for at least 20 years, there is almost no chance you'll round a nut or bolt with a 12 point. But still, I just love these 6 point combination wrenches. I know you don't have the same ability to re-position with less points. Whenever there is room to swing one I always go for these. Call me old school (I even have Saltus wrenches in my tool box).

Gearwrench ratcheting wrenches (stubby and flex head) - Gearwrench are the only Chinese tools I'll buy new. I really prefer US/German/Taiwan. In terms of ratcheting wrenches Gearwrench have the market cornered, they make a great product at a great price. There are options from higher end tool makers, but the cost isn't justified for a hobby guy like myself.

Dowidat Screwdrivers - Vintage German made. The tips still look new after 70+ years of use. Enough said.

Stanley home made mechanic pick/punch - I know you can buy a new real mechanic pick, but my Dad made this years ago out of a Stanley US made screwdriver, long before they outsourced everything. Sentimental value and I'm used to using it for popping clips off electrical connection plugs so it hangs around.

Channel Lock front snip crimper combo - US Made and an industry standard for this type of tool. Cutting blades on this type of tool are a wear item. Buy a good pair or you'll just be buying multiple pairs of snips as the blades dull and no longer take an edge. I used these for cutting zip ties, that's pretty much all that holds my car together.

Challenger by Proto Speeder - I know what you're thinking, everyone knows Challenger by Proto is Proto's budget line of tools. I don't care, the vintage versions of these tools are great value, and this speeder happens to be made in Canada which makes it extra cool.

Craftsman 1/4 flex head ratchet - This is the uber-rare US made Craftsman 1/4 flex head ratchet. It was only made for 2 years. Its got the quick release head, but with no quick release. Its got a warning to wear eye protection forged into the handle. It was overpriced when new and sold poorly, its near impossible to find now. For Craftsman raised panel ratchet lovers like myself it is a must have to complete the collection.

Mechanic magnet, sharpie, painters tape - These come out for every job I do. I'm always dropping things, and always need to mark connections as it will be months before everything goes back together.

apecush 09-19-2012 06:35 PM

does the 944 have a macpherson strut suspension configuration in the front?

chrenan 09-19-2012 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by apecush (Post 20634)
does the 944 have a macpherson strut suspension configuration in the front?

Yes, macpherson strut front. Rear is torsion bars and trailing arms.

JustinL 09-19-2012 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by apecush (Post 20634)
does the 944 have a macpherson strut suspension configuration in the front?

Correct. Semi trailing arm in the rear with torsion bar springs.

Chrenan- you should delete a bunch of that old purge system while you are in there.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.