Straightpipe Forums

Go Back   Straightpipe Forums > The Straightpipe > General Automotive Chat

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 10-02-2016, 12:23 AM
zhao kan's Avatar
zhao kan zhao kan is offline
Super awesome fantastic!
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,032
Default

^ probably pretty accurate if using a mechanical shop to fix everything. There is a guy on 780 tuners with a 335i vert e93 (not long off warranty) who claims he spends 5? thousandish on maintenance a year or something. To me, I ask wtf are the details behind that lemon... but then there is probably a better explanation.

Most common bmw problems are things that are not exactly hard to get at, or that expensive to fix normally. Oil leaks, pumps, das vtec y0 problems, but you know 2-3 hours of labour at a bmw dealership + a part or 2 is probably a G note or 2 easily and I guess that adds up quick... but that's not exactly any different from a Ford or a Nissan.

I know a full brake job at audi was about 2g in the shop, or a few hundred dollars if you did it on your driveway in a morning lol.
__________________
Stratotech: FD - 68.3, NA FC - 68.9, NA MR-2 71.6 (Wet), NA MR-2 71.8 (dry), RSX - 73.0, GC8 WRX - 69.9, fugu's miata - 76.5 daytons+broken alignment and swaybar, em2ftl's civic - DNF
Edmonton Indy Track: IT2 FC race: 159.4 IT2 FC qualify: 159.5. IT2 class track records forever lol.
Race City: FD 129.x, NA mr-2 135.x
Castrol: NA FC 43.1 IT2 class track record until we run the short track again which may be never.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 10-02-2016, 06:03 AM
jcm0791's Avatar
jcm0791 jcm0791 is offline
Super awesome fantastic!
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,851
Default

I will let you in on an industry secret ... ALL cars are crap. New, old, it doesn't matter. New cars are too reliant on electronics to make everything work, require too many specialty tools to truly be owner serviceable, are designed by engineers who (I am sure) have never opened the hood of a car, and the manufacturers don't care because it only need last the warranty period. The time when it was expected that every motorist would (or was even capable of) spending some time every weekend under their car lubing/adjusting/inspecting is long gone. What is needed is what is referred to in legal circles as a 'sofisticated client' ... Someone who knows when to do things themselves and when a mechanic is needed. This will make car ownership as uneventful and inexpensive as it is possible to be. Amateur mechanics are a boon and a curse to a real, trained, experienced mechanic's day. On the one hand, the number of shade tree jobs gone wrong that I see on a daily basis would amuse you. These fit into two categories: The owner has given up on the amatuer's (theirselves or "their buddy's") ability to ever get it done but has accepted that it is going to cost less in the long run to have a professional finish it. The other is the ones who have messed with it so long (or paid for some back alley guy to), and have now also given up, who finally brings the car in and the first thing we discover is that the rest of the car is so in need of attention that the repair in question should never have been embarked upon ... Out of province cars are famous for this.

Anyway, it is possible to have some mechanical sympathy but realize when a job has gone beyond ones abilities. Unfortunately, that is rare today and it is not all the fault of the manufacturers. In many ways, cars are much better. It is no longer regular maintenance to do a valve job every 20,000 miles and a re ring at 40 - 60. On the other hand, cars are no longer built to be repaired, adjusted, rebuilt and lubed like this anymore. Parts wear out eventually and need to be replaced rather than repaired. Blame the owners for this creation of a disposable society ... Which would be fine if it was understood. Instead, cars last for many years requiring almost no work then, when parts that have always worn out anyway need replacement all at once, the owners attitude is "I'm not spending $3000 on this car!" There is no connection between $30,000 car that has needed literally nothing for 5 years now needs $3000 to make it viable for another couple.

In the end, all new cars are built pretty equally, so you may as well buy one you like because there will always be problems (unless one is willing to buy new every two) eventually and if you love your car it won't hurt so bad.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 10-07-2016, 07:14 AM
matt matt is offline
Slow
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 3,193
Send a message via ICQ to matt Send a message via AIM to matt Send a message via MSN to matt
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcm0791 View Post
I will let you in on an industry secret ... ALL cars are crap. New, old, it doesn't matter. New cars are too reliant on electronics to make everything work, require too many specialty tools to truly be owner serviceable, are designed by engineers who (I am sure) have never opened the hood of a car, and the manufacturers don't care because it only need last the warranty period. The time when it was expected that every motorist would (or was even capable of) spending some time every weekend under their car lubing/adjusting/inspecting is long gone. What is needed is what is referred to in legal circles as a 'sofisticated client' ... Someone who knows when to do things themselves and when a mechanic is needed. This will make car ownership as uneventful and inexpensive as it is possible to be. Amateur mechanics are a boon and a curse to a real, trained, experienced mechanic's day. On the one hand, the number of shade tree jobs gone wrong that I see on a daily basis would amuse you. These fit into two categories: The owner has given up on the amatuer's (theirselves or "their buddy's") ability to ever get it done but has accepted that it is going to cost less in the long run to have a professional finish it. The other is the ones who have messed with it so long (or paid for some back alley guy to), and have now also given up, who finally brings the car in and the first thing we discover is that the rest of the car is so in need of attention that the repair in question should never have been embarked upon ... Out of province cars are famous for this.

Anyway, it is possible to have some mechanical sympathy but realize when a job has gone beyond ones abilities. Unfortunately, that is rare today and it is not all the fault of the manufacturers. In many ways, cars are much better. It is no longer regular maintenance to do a valve job every 20,000 miles and a re ring at 40 - 60. On the other hand, cars are no longer built to be repaired, adjusted, rebuilt and lubed like this anymore. Parts wear out eventually and need to be replaced rather than repaired. Blame the owners for this creation of a disposable society ... Which would be fine if it was understood. Instead, cars last for many years requiring almost no work then, when parts that have always worn out anyway need replacement all at once, the owners attitude is "I'm not spending $3000 on this car!" There is no connection between $30,000 car that has needed literally nothing for 5 years now needs $3000 to make it viable for another couple.

In the end, all new cars are built pretty equally, so you may as well buy one you like because there will always be problems (unless one is willing to buy new every two) eventually and if you love your car it won't hurt so bad.
So what you're saying is I should just buy a used 911 and be done with it?
__________________
Potatos.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 10-07-2016, 02:57 PM
JustinL's Avatar
JustinL JustinL is offline
Driver
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Beaumont
Posts: 648
Default

Or you could get in on the ground floor of the 944 turbo bubble!
__________________
B8.5 S4 Daily Driver
944 Turbo S Weekend/Project car
944 S2 Race car
944 team car (25% owner)
VW Touareg Tow rig

We choose to race 944s. We choose to race 944s, not because it is easy, but because it is hard.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 10-08-2016, 04:01 AM
zhao kan's Avatar
zhao kan zhao kan is offline
Super awesome fantastic!
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,032
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinL View Post
Or you could get in on the ground floor of the 944 turbo bubble!
:/

Ya, that's only slightly more collectible than a 1978 cobra mustang.

If you want a porsche that will go up in value, you buy a 911. I'm figuring China is the reason 911s went skyrocketing in price and that will likely never happen with 944s.
__________________
Stratotech: FD - 68.3, NA FC - 68.9, NA MR-2 71.6 (Wet), NA MR-2 71.8 (dry), RSX - 73.0, GC8 WRX - 69.9, fugu's miata - 76.5 daytons+broken alignment and swaybar, em2ftl's civic - DNF
Edmonton Indy Track: IT2 FC race: 159.4 IT2 FC qualify: 159.5. IT2 class track records forever lol.
Race City: FD 129.x, NA mr-2 135.x
Castrol: NA FC 43.1 IT2 class track record until we run the short track again which may be never.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:36 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Styled By bonded-design