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Old 08-11-2014, 12:39 AM
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Default Second set of bearings failed

I replaced my front wheel bearings for my first chump race in 2011. They were toast after the race, stock grease. I ordered another set and packed them with race grease this time. I have one failed form the LA1K. Yes they were torqued to spec.

Im wondering if they are getting too hot and maybe I should make a air deflector.

Im wondering if I have a bad hub that's going to continue to eat bearings and I should try another hub.

The two bearings I got were different quality and brands. The shop I bought them from sells a $60 and a $100 bearing. I think I got one of each but I ordered the $60 non OEM ones. I don't know which went into which hub. One had a much more robust looking bearing race.

Not knowing enough about this, I do need to find a solution. Advice?
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Old 11-13-2014, 10:21 PM
RSX-TACY RSX-TACY is offline
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The life of bearings are affected by heat, load, grease, and overall quality of the bearing itself (materials/design).

It sounds like you're on the right track.
Assuming you were using good bearings, invest in a heat shield between your brakes and wheel bearings and/or get some more airflow going through there to keep things cool.
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Old 11-14-2014, 12:25 AM
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There are some really crapy bearings out there these days. Unfortunately, they are often all that is available ... Period.

If there is a brand name available I would go with them (to me, brand name means Timken, FAG, SKF, or NSK ... And not much else .. England, Germany, Japan ... Any other country of origin is a crap shoot, not necessarily bad just random.

The nature of the failure will say something, but they may be undiagnoseable if they are really destroyed.

Many cars, these days, have barely adequate bearings for street duty. 5x100 Subarus are a problem in the rear combined with a lack of truly high quality bearings. Subaru's fix was to go to a larger bearing, this caused them to have to change to a 5x114.3 wheel bolt pattern... That is why WRX are 5x100 and STi is 114.3. Anything is possible, with enough money you could put bigger bearings in your uprights ... Or build new uprights ... But neither of those are likely to be very cost effective. Probably easier to make them a maintenance part. Replace every 2 or 3 (or once / twice a year) weekends whether they need it or not. Doesn't really solve the 11 hour race problem (maybe have a spare set of uprights ready to go and practice until it takes you 3 minutes to change them)
Cool air ... Cool the brakes, cool the bearings, cool the calipers ... Maybe 2 piece rotors (aluminum hat) so that less heat transfers through the hats into the hub ...
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Old 11-14-2014, 04:18 AM
RSX-TACY RSX-TACY is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcm0791 View Post
Maybe 2 piece rotors (aluminum hat) so that less heat transfers through the hats into the hub ...
Good point.
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Old 11-14-2014, 05:51 AM
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At your next opportunity to test it would be interesting to grab some temperatures off the hub with an IR thermo. You're an IT guy, time to put together some data logging with an arduino and some cheap sensors.
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Old 11-14-2014, 10:03 PM
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I am trying to keep the car chump car legal, so two piece rotors are out.
I know I had two different grades of bearings last time. So I put in a name brand this time and I will improve the airflow, the hose terminated a inch or two from the hub before. I will make sure I get it closer. I also used a differentl hub , just in case....

So hopefully that does the trick. And I guess I have to plan for a replacement pair after so many hours of racing to be safe.

Will get temps when I can, doesnt hurt to know. We boiled ATF super blue at the LA1K
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Old 11-15-2014, 02:01 AM
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I will also suggest 'better' pads. We had a situation a few years back where the rotors kept warping on the GT2 car. Changing the pad material sorted it out. It seemed unintuitive, still does, but the best I can figure is that the soft pads were generating more heat in the rotor because of a lack of bite or poor heat conduction through the pad or ... Magic?

Anyway, if you aren't running some good race pads with a high coeficent of friction (bite) it might be worth considering a change ... Chump is fairly liberal in the brake department ... Perhaps there is a bolt on solution from another model ... I can't remember what your chump car is .... Nissan has a lot of flexibility here, pretty much all the calipers have the same bolt pattern and you can often mix and match with only bolt circle re drilling required.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RSX-TACY View Post
The life of bearings are affected by heat, load, grease, and overall quality of the bearing itself (materials/design).

It sounds like you're on the right track.
Assuming you were using good bearings, invest in a heat shield between your brakes and wheel bearings and/or get some more airflow going through there to keep things cool.
Improper installation is also a leading cause of premature failure. Are you using the proper tools/procedures?
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Old 02-12-2015, 07:43 PM
Al36rx7 Al36rx7 is offline
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Improper torqueing, quality/max temp range of grease yes. Maybe I have been lucky...I have not had any problems with bearings (cheapo or OEM). But...My only comment is to get more air blowing on the hub/brake rotors.
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Old 02-12-2015, 11:29 PM
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I am running race pads and the calipers\rotors and race pads are about as big as I can fit in the chump rules. I forget what pads but they are race pads, not performance pads. 13 inch rotors now. My ducting is only 2 inch but thats all I could fit, but the scoops got knocked out of place during the LA1K, so I dont think they were all that effective.

Top line bearings, race grease, will increase and fix the ducting scoops and cross my fingers that 3rd time is the charm. Bearings were installed each time by a different 'certified' mechanic. First time no race grease, second time I think a cheaper bearing on one side....

Maybe I can add a air deflector in addition to the ducting.
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